Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Anime

To Your Eternity Season 2 release date in Fall 2022: Fumetsu no Anata e Season 2 sequel changes studio, director

The To Your Eternity Season 2 release date has been confirmed for October 2022, the Fall 2022 anime season.

The Fumetsu no Anata e Season 2 release date time frame was announced by NHK on August 30, 2021, shortly before Episode 20 was released on Crunchyroll.

The second season will have 20 episodes in total according to the NHK website. Due to the story pacing of the manga series, it was previously predicted that the second season would have two cours once again. (For more details, please see the manga comparison section below.)

What’s a “cour,” you might ask? For those unfamiliar with the lingo, a “cour” is a three-month block of TV broadcasting based on the physical seasons usually composed of 10 to 13 episodes.

The To Your Eternity Season 2 trailer revealed the surprise that the main staff and studio producing the second season were both changing.

For the first season, the anime TV series was produced by Studio Brain’s Base, which is best known for anime like the 2010 Durarara!!, the 2013 Blood Lad anime, the first season of My Teen Romantic Comedy SNAFU, Spice and Wolf Season 2 (Spice and Wolf Season 3 seems to be in development), and Crunchyroll’s In/Spectre anime (In/Spectre Season 2 anime confirmed to be in production by Crunchyroll).

To Your Eternity Season 2 will be produced by Studio Drive. They’ve previously animated the original story Vlad Love and in 2022 they’re also releasing Teppen! and Uzamaki: Spiral Into Horror. In the future, Studio Drive is also producing KonoSuba Season 3 and the KonoSuba Explosion anime that’s focused on a Megumin prequel.

The first season of To Your Eternity was helmed by director Masahiko Murata. In the past, he’s been an episode director on the Naruto anime TV series and a movie director for several Naruto Shippuuden movies. More recently, he’s been the main director for Baby Steps Seasons 1 and 2 and an episode director for the 2020 Tower of God anime.

The new To Your Eternity Season 2 director is Kiyoko Sayama. She’s worked on anime such as the 2008 Skip Beat! and Vampire Knight: Guilty, the 2012 Brave 10, and the 2018 Amanchu! Advance.

The remainder of the main staff seems to be returning for To Your Eternity Season 2.

Writer Shinzou Fujita (Pokemon XY&Z) handled the series composition. Artist Koji Yabuno (Naruto Shippuuden) was the character designer. Composer Ryo Kawasaki (Fate/Grand Order, Muhyo & Roji’s Bureau of Supernatural Investigation) created the music.

The To Your Eternity Season 2 OP (opening) and ED (ending) theme song music haven’t been announced yet.

For the first season, the To Your Eternity OP “PINK BLOOD” was performed and written by Utada Hikaru, while the ED “Mediator” was created by Masashi Hamauzu.

The OP and ED for To Your Eternity Part 2 (cour 2) did not change.

The first season had an odd number of episodes. Producer/TV broadcaster NHK confirmed that the first season will have two cours with 20 episodes in total.

A recap of the first 12 episodes aired on July 5, 2021. That meant the To Your Eternity Episode 13 release date was on July 12, 2021.

The anime TV series did not release an episode on July 5, 2021. The To Your Eternity Episode 12 release date was on July 12, 2021.

The first season’s finale, To Your Eternity Episode 20: Echoes, was released on August 30, 2021. The 20 episodes were released as three To Your Eternity Blu-Ray/DVD volumes.

This article provides everything that is known about To Your Eternity Season 2 (Fumetsu no Anata e Season 2) and all related news. As such, this article will be updated over time with news, rumors, and analysis. Meanwhile, let’s delve down into what is known for certain.

The first season of To Your Eternity was streaming with English subtitles on Crunchyroll, VRV, and Netflix Japan (not Netflix U.S.).

Crunchyroll’s The To Your Eternity English dub release date is May 31, 2021. Here is the cast:

The To Your Eternity dub will also include Spanish, Portuguese, French, and German dubs.

Note: The details about the To Your Eternity Season 2 English dub will be added in the future.

As of the last update, NHK, Studio Brain’s Base, or any company related to the production of the anime has not officially confirmed the exact To Your Eternity Season 2 release date. However, the To Your Eternity sequel has been announced and it’s coming out in Fall 2022, which typically means the October time frame.

Once the news is officially confirmed this article will be updated with the relevant information concerning the exact Fumetsu no Anata e Season 2 release date.

The To Your Eternity reviews were higher than usual, almost pushing it into masterpiece status. This shouldn’t be too surprising since the first several story arcs of the manga series are said to be the best so far. (The same can be said about the Tokyo Revengers anime.)

More importantly, the anime’s first season was often in the top 10 on Crunchyroll’s popular anime list right next to My Hero Academia Season 5, Tokyo Revengers, So I’m a Spider, So What? Part 2, Don’t Toy With Me, Miss Nagatoro, and Welcome to Demon School! Iruma-kun Season 2.

Therefore, it’s not very surprising that the To Your Eternity anime was renewed immediately. It’s always possible the producers predicted this anime would be a winner and had begun early production work in advance of the first season’s finale.

The only question was studio availability since anime productions are scheduled out years in advance. The anime industry as a whole is working at overcapacity and it’s only expected to become busier in the coming years. Thus, back in 2021, Anime Geek predicted the possibility of a studio switch.

The reason for the studio change is that, historically, Studio Brain’s Base has only worked on 2 to 3 projects per year and they rarely do sequels. Unless In/Spectre Season 2 was also shopped out to a different studio, we know that’ll be one of their upcoming projects, but the To Your Eternity sequel always seemed uncertain to remain with Brain’s Base.

But at least we don’t have to wait too long for To Your Eternity Season 2 release date.

The story for the anime is based on the Fumetsu no Anata e manga series (which is also known by fans as To You, the Immortal) by author Yoshitoki Ooima. She is best known for creating the A Silent Voice manga series, which was adapted into a 2016 anime movie.

The To Your Eternity manga series has been serialized in Weekly Shonen Magazine since November 2016. Already well past 150 chapters, the series has been collected into 16 volumes as of August 2021.

Although the manga is serialized weekly, the author has a history of taking regular breaks. Check out this To Your Eternity hiatus chart and you’ll see Ooima took off 26 weeks in the first several years alone.

Publisher Kodansha USA is releasing the official English translation of the To Your Eternity in North America. As of January 25, 2022, the official English To Your Eternity manga was up to Volume 16.

The To Your Eternity manga’s ending will take at least several more years to reach since Ooima has discussed in the past how she intends on dividing the story into three major parts or sagas. Part 1 is the Past Era. Part 2 is the Present Era. Part 3 is the Future Era.

As of 2022, the story was divided up into only two main sagas so far. The first saga had 9 story arcs and concluded with Chapter 116. The second saga started in January 2020 and it introduced the new Current Era in the timeline.

Assuming the sagas are roughly the same number of chapters or story arcs, and assuming Ooima continues to take regular hiatus/breaks, it should take at least another four to six years before the climax and final arc are reached.

In a 2018 interview with Konomanga, the creator says she conceived the manga’s title when her grandmother died. It was the first idea she came up with and when she submitted the title to the editor, he said, “That’s the best!”

Ooima compared To Your Eternity to A Silent Voice, noting that the latter focused on confronting the past while her current work is focused on the future. Ooima said that she wanted to create a fantasy story since the setting gives her more artistic freedom in comparison to modern times.

Note: The following paragraph has minor spoilers.

The story has ghosts, a heaven-like paradise, reincarnation, and even mythical creatures. In a blink-and-you-missed-it moment, the houses in Episode 1 were obviously made from boats, but did you notice the dragon bone on the ceiling? The manga’s story also intended to imply that the nameless boy at the beginning is one of the “people who ended up there”, rather than “there is a village there”.

Ooima also compared To Your Eternity to her previous work, Mardock Scramble. The main character, Rune Balot, was a homeless child prostitute and one of the main themes was suicidal thoughts and trying to figure out why she has them, how to keep him away from them, and how to save her.

In a similar manner, the starting point of To Your Eternity faces this issue as well as “preparing for my own death”. The major difference from previous works is that Fushi starts without emotions. Instead, of facing the past, the theme is about facing the future, which is “why it’s very troubling”.

Ooima also spoke about how weekly serialization causes her stress to the point that her character’s feelings mirror her own.

“I’m thinking, ‘I might die,’ every week. I don’t want to finish the manga!” she said. “I’m stressed to the max. I decided a long time ago that I would never commit suicide, but now I think, ‘I’ll die when this is finished,’ or ‘I’ll go to the sea of trees when this is over.’ But I can’t die yet. There’s so much I want to do, but I feel like I’m going to die without being able to do what I want to do, without being able to achieve my goals, and that’s really painful.”

The author also spoke about how she came up for the idea of Fushi being a sphere that reacts to external stimulus. The concept is about the protagonist being “a boy who knows nothing” so the reader, in turn, wants to find themselves while reading Fushi’s story.

“The setting of him changing into various forms was something I created when I started the series, but I don’t know where it came from,” Ooima said. “After I started drawing it, I later thought it was similar to Ufcock from Mardock Sbamle. So when I told Ubukata-san that I was going to draw a character that looked like Ufcock, he said, ‘Please say that in many places,’ so I just did (laughs).”

Fushi was originally intended to be a girl character. The author was “trying to make the character neutral so that it [Fushi] wouldn’t feel gendered. It’s just that I like neutral-looking women.” But the artist also desired to draw a variety of characters from all sorts of races.

“How many manga series do I have to draw in order to fulfill my desire to draw a variety of protagonists and to make this guy the protagonist?” she explained. “If I can change the shape of the main character, or change the characters involved with Fushi like an omnibus, then I can draw a variety of characters.”

To Your Eternity Episode 1 is beautiful. It could have been a standalone short film and everyone would have praised it as a masterpiece that delved into the alluring mystery of human life and how one prepares for your own death.

The next set of episodes continued this emotional rollercoaster by introducing us to the little girl March and her dream of becoming a grown-up.

By To Your Eternity Episode 6, Fushi had attained a level of self-actualization roughly equivalent to a first-grader. Audiences were introduced to the villains the form/memory-stealing Nokkers, although they weren’t named as such until Episode 10.

The motives of The Beholder were finally revealed. The antagonists are called Nokkers by The Beholder since they “[k]nock on the doors of paradise, seeking its destruction.”

All of these events took place in only 13 manga chapters, with the first episode adapting only the first chapter.

To Your Eternity Episode 7 began adapting one of the longer story arcs of the manga series, the Takunaha arc about Gugu. By Episode 11, the anime was up to the first page of Chapter 28.

Thankfully, this good pacing has meant the adaptation has remained mostly true to the heart of the story. There was some narration and dialogue that was either skipped or condensed, but most of the alterations were minor.

One insightful line from the manga that was skipped should have taken place in Episode 4. When Fushi was trying to escape from the torment of being repeatedly attacked, the narration from The Beholder pointed out that Fushi could have transformed into an object without consciousness (like the rock) in order to escape the pain, but he chose to remain in his new flesh forms.

The ending of Episode 6 skipped straight to Fushi meeting Gugu, which meant events were reordered slightly. A flashback in Episode 7 showed Gugu’s backstory since it’s important for developing the plot.

Episode 7 also introduced anime-original material for the first time. The short scene at the episode’s end about laughing was original.

Episode 8 modified the characterization of Gugu’s action. In the manga, Gugu was taking out his resentment on Fushi, whereas in the anime it seemed like he was simply being thoughtless.

Ironically, Episode 9 made Rean’s arm wound slightly bigger. The change was probably made so it’s easier to see on TV screens when viewed from a distance.

Episode 10 gave a generic explanation for the motives of the Nokkers, which was odd since in the manga their very name was based on them being creatures that knock upon the door of paradise, plotting its destruction.

What stood out about Episode 11 was the remarkable job by the Japanese voice actor. With the passing of years, Fushi’s annunciation and articulation have improved, whereas before the actor’s voice hesitated and used clipped tones.

The next set of episodes jumped into Jananda Island. What’s neat is that anime-only fans were probably expecting the typical shonen tournament arc where Fushi trained to take on the nokkers. Instead, the anime deconstructs that concept, showing just how useless the tournament really is for the people since it’s merely entertainment for bloodthirsty criminals.

One notable change is that Tonari’s sympathetic flashback was pushed back from Episode 14 to Episode 16. Doing so changed how anime-only audiences would perceive Tonari as a relatable person. Knowing her backstory frames her mindset and provides the context of her actions, so anime-only probably preserved a passionate hatred for the character longer than manga readers.

This change also turned Episode 16 into a double whammy. Not only did the anime finally humanize Tonari, but the anime’s brutal visual depiction of Parona’s death scene was also far more heart-wrenching in comparison to manga Chapter 43.

On the other hand, it could have been far, far worse since the manga had Hayase bragging about torturing Parona by deciding between ripping out her guts or stealing Parona’s face. Hayase literally skinned Parona’s face off and in the process that’s how she “accidentally” decapitated Parona’s head. While the manga only described what happened, the anime showed part of it while skipping the more gory details.

The anime did hold back during Hayase’s attempted r*pe of Fushi in Episode 17. Manga Chapter 45 fully showed Hayase’s scarred chest whereas the anime censored that moment.

On the other hand, it was fairly horrifying how Fushi’s “shell” was shown to draw breath and then quickly die. The manga also contained that moment but seeing it animated definitely heightened the emotional impact.

Episode 19 was great for manga readers largely due to seeing Hayase’s comeuppance in the boat with the nokker being animated.

The pacing of To Your Eternity Part 2 was a bit faster in order to adapt the lengthier story arcs. After all, the anime’s key visual shows the character Tonari, a girl that Fushi meets as part of the 21-chapter-long Jananda Island arc.

All in all, as predicted the finale, To Your Eternity Episode 20, found a stopping point corresponding to the ending of Volume 6, Chapter 54.

It’s the best stopping point since the Jananda Island story arc finishes with a touching moment for Piroan’s character arc. Volume 7: Chapter 55 also begins with a time skip that leads into the next story arc, so it was best for the anime’s first season to end in Volume 6.

The good news is that there is currently plenty of source material for making To Your Eternity Season 2. Better yet, the ending of the first saga in Chapter 116 would be a great stopping point for the second season.

That would mean the second saga, the Present Era, would begin to be adapted by To Your Eternity Season 3.

The last time audiences watched the anime, Pyoran had passed away. Grieving the loss, Fushi buried the old woman’s body and decided to write down the events so he’d never forget.

That’s when he finds a message from Pyoran that says, “Fushi, what is your dream? Do like me and do whatever you want!”

Years later, Fushi is still living on the island, all alone with the exception of the Black Hood. The ghostly figure claims that Fushi must become capable of recreating anything, even including the vastness of the sea, but an exasperated Fushi believes that’ll take thousands of years.

Fushi had isolated himself since he didn’t want to watch anyone else die, not even the animals or fish of the sea. He spent years living as small sea creatures, even as their excrement!

He did wonder what had happened to his friends since so much time had passed. But even those thoughts were not enough to move him from the island.

When the Nokkers eventually came knocking, Fushi prevailed but he decided to physically train the human form that he felt most at home living in, the boy from the icy wasteland. He defeated many Nokkers during these 40 years, but at the end of it all he felt was boredom.

What finally provokes Fushi into leaving the island is an attack by Nokkers. Not against Fushi on the island, but an attack that killed humans in place that is a month’s journey away from the island.

While that was surprising, Fushi was even more astonished when a young girl approached him on the island along with escorts.

The girl’s name was Hisame, the granddaughter of Hayase. The young girl believes herself to be Hayase’s reincarnation and has designated herself as Fushi’s guardian who will protect him from the Nokkers.

And, yes, the whole family shares an unhealthy obsession with the immortal Fushi. She’s clingy and constantly hovering over Fushi just as she was taught to do by her mother… but the reason is a hidden agenda.

One night, Hisame’s arm tries to attack Fushi as if it has a will of its own. It turns out Hayase’s Nokker core was passed down to her daughter Oumi and then onto Hisame. The core lives off Hisame’s blood and can understand her speech even if it can’t talk itself.

Traveling together, Fushi and his new little Guardian travel to the location of the Nokker attack. Fushi quickly realizes that he’s famous since the legend of the white-haired immortal has spread far and wide over the years.

While notoriety might be sought by some, in Fushi’s case he has a new worry. Various forces are working to possess and control him.

Fushi finds himself reunited with an old friend, Tonari of Jananda, but he doesn’t even recognize the older woman as a friend. And although Fushi came running to help the village he still believes he can’t have friends and must live alone to avoid experiencing the death of loved ones.

As might be expected, things don’t go well between Hisame and his old friends. Fushi eventually finds himself moving on alone, but not before Hisame reveals that it was Hayase’s goal for her bloodline to have children with Fushi!

Of course, neither Fushi or Hisame know where babies come from. Hisame’s mother simply told her that she must “sleep together”, leaving Fushi even more confused since he’s “slept with a lot of people” without having children…

Over the coming years, Fushi drifted between towns, killing Nokkers every so many months per year. He eventually comes to the realization that he does indeed desire companions, or friends, on this long journey.

During his long travels, Fushi would occasionally run into more of Hayase’s descendants, including Hisame’s own daughter Oumi and then granddaughter Ushio and so on. Every single one was a weirdo who was way too friendly to Fushi, but at least these Guardians did keep their promise about finding and defeating Nokkers.

Eventually, Fushi finds himself being bothered by Hayese’s sixth successor, Kahaku, the first male in the line of Guardians. Kahaku’s mother died before giving birth to a girl so the Guardians had no choice in choosing him.

Unfortunately, over time a religion calling itself the Bennett church has declared both Fushi and the Guardians as heretics. The church believes Fushi to be an evil being that attracts the Nokkers and now there’s a bounty on his head.

Despite all of Fushi’s efforts the threat of the Nokkers has continued to grow. Fushi has exterminated many Nokkers over time. In turn, the monsters have killed many thousands in distant locations Fushi can’t reach and this death toll weighs heavily on Fushi’s heart.

Eventually, Fushi and Kahaku find themselves captured by a very odd and charismatic man named Prince “Bon” Bonchien Nicoli la Tasty Peach Uralis of the Uralis Kingdom. Prince Bon hopes to put Fushi in captivity in hopes of impressing his father so that he can be named the next king of the land.

But rather than ending in captivity, this chance meeting is a new beginning for Fushi. Although Fushi could have easily escaped, he let himself be captured in hopes that he can make an ally of the Prince.

After all, Prince Bon literally has a small army at his command. More importantly, the Prince has the supernatural ability to see the dead, which means he can track Fushi wherever he may go… and even speak to the Black Hood, which leads to Prince Bon making a startling discovery about Fushi.

Of course, neither Fushi nor Prince Bon is taking into account the further actions of the Bennett Church. Will these unlikely “friends” be able to join together in the fight against the Nokkers?

Unfortunately, anime fans will have to wait until the To Your Eternity Season 2 release date to watch what happens next. Stay tuned!

To Your Eternity English dub release date confirmed

Fumetsu no Anata e Season 2 release date in October 2022

To Your Eternity manga’s ending is many years away

Yoshitoki Ooima interview compares the themes of A Silent Voice to To Your Eternity’s story

Fumetsu no Anata e manga compared to the anime

To Your Eternity Season 2 anime TV spoilers (plot summary/synopsis)

Useful Info

Other stuff

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You May Also Like

Anime

The official YouTube channel for Bandai Namco Entertainment’s Tales of series began streaming the second trailer for Tales of Luminaria the Fateful Crossroad, Kamikaze Douga’s anime adaptation of the Tales of Luminaria smartphone game, and it...

Anime

Pony Canyon posted the official main trailer for Part 2 of the Attack on Titan The Final Season anime on Tuesday. The season’s Part 2 will premiere with episode...

Anime

The Anime Tourism Association opened its annual online survey for a list of fantastic anime locations. If you don’t see your favorite spot, don’t...

Anime

The official Twitter account for the Muv-Luv Alternative anime that the series will get a second season that will premiere in October 2022 on Fuji TV’s [+Ultra] programming...

Copyright © 2020 ZoxPress Theme. Theme by MVP Themes, powered by WordPress.